"Another month, another Vogue cover. As is to be expected, another beautiful female face (on this issue Rooney Mara) stares up from its cover, advertised as ‘Pale Fire’. So far, so Vogue. Inside, more and more models, blondes and brunettes, don the whims of this season’s darling designers. Again, none of this seems out of place. But it should be, because out of 1, 416 covers since US Vogue’s creation in 1892, just 14 have featured a non white model. That is less than 0.1%. It’s not simply a culture of exclusion, either. The 2012 catwalk for the Spring/Summer catwalk Dolce and Gabbana featured what appeared to be a Blackamoor statue on an earring. John Galliano’s famously anti-semitic outburst in a Parisian bar in 2011 during which he told a group of Italian women that in the second world war, ‘your mothers, your forefathers would all be fucking gassed’ and the subsequent defence of his actions as ‘farce’ and ‘theatre’ by stylist Patricia Field are shocking. They testify to an industry where racial stereotyping or abuse is all too often swept under the carpet or even celebrated.”
Eliza Grimond from the Oxford Student on Fashion and Racism

"Another month, another Vogue cover. As is to be expected, another beautiful female face (on this issue Rooney Mara) stares up from its cover, advertised as ‘Pale Fire’. So far, so Vogue. Inside, more and more models, blondes and brunettes, don the whims of this season’s darling designers. Again, none of this seems out of place. But it should be, because out of 1, 416 covers since US Vogue’s creation in 1892, just 14 have featured a non white model. That is less than 0.1%. It’s not simply a culture of exclusion, either. The 2012 catwalk for the Spring/Summer catwalk Dolce and Gabbana featured what appeared to be a Blackamoor statue on an earring. John Galliano’s famously anti-semitic outburst in a Parisian bar in 2011 during which he told a group of Italian women that in the second world war, ‘your mothers, your forefathers would all be fucking gassed’ and the subsequent defence of his actions as ‘farce’ and ‘theatre’ by stylist Patricia Field are shocking. They testify to an industry where racial stereotyping or abuse is all too often swept under the carpet or even celebrated.”

Eliza Grimond from the Oxford Student on Fashion and Racism

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